Tag: Nashville

Artist Spotlight: Martica Griffin

posted by – 01/24/17 @ 4:11pm

Dreamboat, 48"x48" acrylic and mixed media on canvas

Dreamboat, 48″x48″ acrylic and mixed media on canvas

Martica Griffin is a Nashville-based artist whose work is primarily abstract and figurative. She has been with Tinney Contemporary for over eight years and four of her works are currently being exhibited in the gallery’s new show, Women of Abstraction.

For the pieces in the exhibition, Griffin drew inspiration from children’s stories – “each with a positive message, strong rhythm, and great sense of humor. Some of the paintings are a bit more structured, others freer and flowing, but all with the same purpose – to stir up the imagination through color, line and texture.”

Her four exhibited paintings focus on having the same starting point and limited palette. Each work starts with intentional and organic black lines covered with a colored grid. This gives each piece a unique sense of energy and rhythm. The work is then built, layer upon layer, through painting, drawing, and scraping, until the completed piece is revealed. Characterized by energetic lines and bold colors, each piece should leave viewers with a smile.

Altered State, 47"x47" acrylic and mixed media on canvas

Altered State, 47″x47″ acrylic and mixed media on canvas

Although her current works utilize the same starting point, Griffin normally works with a continuously changing process. Sometimes her canvases are first filled with color, while other times the canvas is filled with marks or crazy textures using tape, spackle or thick gloss medium. Griffin’s desire to always try new ways of tackling the canvas drives her continuously evolving process and ever-changing way of viewing the world around her. For example, Griffin is currently working on a new body of work on paper that involves starting with offbeat materials and then depicting a figurative group using only large sharpies.

 

On the topic of producing art, Griffin believes creating work can sometimes be frustrating and unenjoyable but is ultimately rewarding. She says, “When I feel like something is finished, that’s the payoff. And when someone has one of my paintings in their home or office and it adds to their life, that’s the best.”

Artists of Music City Center

posted by – 06/06/13 @ 3:29pm

Three artists from Tinney Contemporary were chosen to adorn the walls of Nashville’s new Music City Center.

Anna Jaap, John Folsom, and Pam Longobardi help fill the 1.2 million square foot space of the new convention center.

Anna Jaap

“This work is part of the SKYFIELD series—sixteen works on canvas created over a two year period with a focus on the intersections of physical and spiritual reality.

The descriptive title phrase “when the hours of daylight are few and the hours of darkness many” is taken from a book entitled Botany for Gardeners by Harold William Rickett, published in 1957.  It speaks eloquently of the period of dormancy in the life cycle that is necessary to foster new beginnings.”

John Folsom

This work is part of Anodyne Frontiers. Folsom’s first encounter with Shaker Village was at a family reunion back in October 2011. Immediately struck by the severe symmetry of the dwellings, Folsom found that the austere nature of the architecture seemed to reflect back onto the landscape, which itself possessed a formalism usually reserved for manicured estates.  In thinking about the direction for this work, Folsom also discovered the word “Anodyne” and its relationship to the pharmacopeia of antiquated medicine. Though the word itself relates more specifically to any kind of analgesic that will numb pain, these days it is used more acutely to describe anything unlikely to cause offense or debate.

Folsom became increasingly interested in that idea, relating it visually to the way images rendered in a more liminal palette can inhabit interior spaces almost imperceptibly.  Using large swaths of cool color that upon closer inspection reveal a frontier land slowly coming into focus, Folsom presents the structures and landscape of Shaker Village as a living museum, hovering on the edge of perception. Through the use of color and mixed media, Folsom’s Anodyne Frontiers, exemplifies this fascinating “in-between” quality.

Pam Longobardi

 

From Discontinuity Continuum. Longobardi shows new work in paintings on copper, collage-cyanotype works on paper.  The paintings create self-contained universes where Longobardi visualizes a future point where unprecedented changes wrought by humans may be clearly read through the paintings’ materiality.  She uses a combination of naturally occurring materials (copper and chemical patinas) and industrially created materials  (plastics, acrylic and lacquers) that are mixed to create that cracks, craters and stratigraphic layers on the copper panel.  These works reveal large, connected energy systems punctuated by the minutia of a microscopic lens, continuing her investigation of the problematic psychological relationship between humans and the natural world while simultaneously suggesting an interconnected fate.