Tag: Disorderly Notions

Wanderlust

posted by – 07/23/13 @ 3:44pm

 

 

Wanderlust: |ˈwändərˌləst| noun, a strong desire to travel.

The term bonds Patricia Bellan- Gillen’s “Disorderly Notions” to the upcoming fashion seen in fall 2013 collections. Designers and our featured artist use hues of magenta and aqua to carry us into the fall, not letting us forget the majestic shades that summer leaves behind. The upcoming season also holds onto patterns of rich flora, much like the captivating environment Patricia Bellan- Gillen presents in her over-life-size pieces. The spirit of travel along with the ability to recall a memorable place are crucial to Bellan- Gillen’s show. Wanderlust inspires an affection to continually move. However, with each journey, a time of recollection and an awareness to such memories allows each “wanderluster” to create their own ideas of what is before them. Wilderness and travel inspire fashion, much like Bellan- Gillen’s attraction to adventure and the great outdoors. This lifestyle trend combines modern functionality with traditional fashion styles.

 

“Somewhere in the Brain”

posted by – 07/16/13 @ 2:13pm

Artists, critics, curators, gallerists, auctioneers, and collectors analyze contemporary art to bring forth its relevance and expose its fundamental nature, such as the medium or symbolism. On the other hand, the general public’s reaction to contemporary art provides a socially conscious response that incorporates contemporaneity with time, place, and ethics. Both viewers engage, but which is the “right” way to perceive contemporary art?

Patricia Bellan- Gillen’s “Disorderly Notions,” on display now here at Tinney Contemporary, employs the art of perception itself. The artist relies on all viewers to narrate her works, pulling from their own anecdotal memories. I overheard many art crawlers at the July Art Crawl ask, “what does this mean?” or “why does she use this specific motif?” The analytical essay spelling out the symbolic truths and answering such fundamental questions does not exist in this case.

“Somewhere in the brain” begins the artist’s exhibition write-up, enhancing the elusive and ambiguous scenes. The scale of Patricia Bellan- Gillen’s work demands attention and her use of mixed media compliment the multi-layered function of her work.

I recently read, “Any art that relies on an essay to explain it is not art,” holding true to Patricia’s theory of thriving on the inexplicable, the intuitive, and the enigmatic. The artist calls welcomes such provocation and puzzlement, placing trust in the viewer to simply react. Therefore, it is fitting that “Disorderly Notions” will remain on display for the August Art Crawl, inviting all contemporaries to not ask, but tell.