Tag: Anna Jaap

Artists of Music City Center

posted by – 06/06/13 @ 3:29pm

Three artists from Tinney Contemporary were chosen to adorn the walls of Nashville’s new Music City Center.

Anna Jaap, John Folsom, and Pam Longobardi help fill the 1.2 million square foot space of the new convention center.

Anna Jaap

“This work is part of the SKYFIELD series—sixteen works on canvas created over a two year period with a focus on the intersections of physical and spiritual reality.

The descriptive title phrase “when the hours of daylight are few and the hours of darkness many” is taken from a book entitled Botany for Gardeners by Harold William Rickett, published in 1957.  It speaks eloquently of the period of dormancy in the life cycle that is necessary to foster new beginnings.”

John Folsom

This work is part of Anodyne Frontiers. Folsom’s first encounter with Shaker Village was at a family reunion back in October 2011. Immediately struck by the severe symmetry of the dwellings, Folsom found that the austere nature of the architecture seemed to reflect back onto the landscape, which itself possessed a formalism usually reserved for manicured estates.  In thinking about the direction for this work, Folsom also discovered the word “Anodyne” and its relationship to the pharmacopeia of antiquated medicine. Though the word itself relates more specifically to any kind of analgesic that will numb pain, these days it is used more acutely to describe anything unlikely to cause offense or debate.

Folsom became increasingly interested in that idea, relating it visually to the way images rendered in a more liminal palette can inhabit interior spaces almost imperceptibly.  Using large swaths of cool color that upon closer inspection reveal a frontier land slowly coming into focus, Folsom presents the structures and landscape of Shaker Village as a living museum, hovering on the edge of perception. Through the use of color and mixed media, Folsom’s Anodyne Frontiers, exemplifies this fascinating “in-between” quality.

Pam Longobardi

 

From Discontinuity Continuum. Longobardi shows new work in paintings on copper, collage-cyanotype works on paper.  The paintings create self-contained universes where Longobardi visualizes a future point where unprecedented changes wrought by humans may be clearly read through the paintings’ materiality.  She uses a combination of naturally occurring materials (copper and chemical patinas) and industrially created materials  (plastics, acrylic and lacquers) that are mixed to create that cracks, craters and stratigraphic layers on the copper panel.  These works reveal large, connected energy systems punctuated by the minutia of a microscopic lens, continuing her investigation of the problematic psychological relationship between humans and the natural world while simultaneously suggesting an interconnected fate.

Movin’ on Up

posted by – 02/25/12 @ 3:05pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Towering over Commerce Street, the FirstBank building isn’t the first venue that comes to mind when one thinks of art–and yet, the edifice is quickly becoming a model for office-building exhibitions. Through their “Art of Community” project, donors Jim and Janet Ayers are transforming what could be a serious, static environment into a who’s who of Tennessee artists: the building will features works from over 50 artists from the Volunteer State, including three of Tinney’s very own–Anna Jaap, John Folsom, and Mary Postal.

Ayers have also tapped some of Nashville’s eminent curators for the project, including Celia Walker of Vanderbilt University Libraries Special Projects, and Susan Edwards of the Frist Center for the Visual Arts. We’re so compelled by the pseudo-exhibition because it has a music festival-esque vibe to it–bringing diverse artists together under one roof–like Bonnaroo or Lollapalooza. Plus, it doesn’t hurt that you can check out works from some of our past artists, right in the heart of Nashville. Are you planning on checking out the revamped FirstBank building? Let us know in the comments section.

– TC