Month: November 2016

Sumida Hokusai Museum Opening

posted by – 11/29/16 @ 3:02pm

An article on Artnet details the opening of the Sumida Hokusai Museum in Tokyo on November 22nd. The museum features the work of Katsushika Hokusai, a Japanese artist best recognized for his The Great Wave off Kanazawa. This iconic 19th Century woodblock print, from his “36 Views of Mount Fuji” series will be on display in the museum alongside changing exhibitions featuring a collection of 1,800 paintings by the artist.  The museum also features a recreation of Hokusai’s Susanoo-no-Mikoto Yakujin Taiji no Zu, which had been lost in the Great Kanot Earthquake in 1923, as well as Sumidagawa Ryogan Keshiki Zukan, a 23 foot long scroll recovered from going missing for over a century when it was taken abroad.

(AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko/Japan Times)

(AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko/Japan Times)

Hokusai was a famous artist, best known for his illustrations, paintings, and prints done in the ukiyo-e genre, featuring a seemingly hedonistic urban Japanese lifestyle. It wasn’t until his 70’s when Hokusai created one of the art world’s most iconic images, nicknamed The Great Wave. The print can be seen in across the globe in museums from New York, Boston, Chicago and LA.  The print’s original conception was rooted in commercialism. The  “36 Views of Mount Fuji” series was intended to showcase Mount Fuji as a sacred icon of Japanese identity that had its own cult following.  The prints enjoyed attention on the souvenir market, as they were easily reproducible.  Japanese art historians are hesitant to call The Great Wave a definitive representation of their artistic culture because woodblock prints in that style were regarded as a form of expression and commercial printing, not fine art.

Today, The Great Wave enjoys status as a one of the most reproduced artworks in the world.  It has been referenced in films, modern graphic design, video games, album artwork, and even reproduced as a sculpture.  A smaller version of the work is even featured as an emoji!

Regina Jose Galindo at the Vanderbilt Football Stadium

posted by – 11/10/16 @ 1:31pm

regina

This Saturday, November 12th, at 10:00 AM, Regina Jose Galindo, an internationally recognized performance artist will be premiering a public performance piece in the Vanderbilt Football Stadium. Entitled Comunidad, this piece calls upon the Latinx community to exhibit its resilience in troubling times.  Galindo is setting out to “generate a real experience of the strength of the community,” rather than just a pictorial representation.

 

Regina was born in Guatemala and lives in Guatemala City.  As a poet and an artist, her work explores the ethical implications of social injustice. She uses her own body in performance art pieces to illustrate how institutional violence can impact the bodies of women and minorities around the world.  Her often graphic, courageous pieces serve as reenactments of violent history.  Regina calls on her audience to remember this history and use that memory as a tool against social injustice.

 

Galindo calls on the Latinx community of Nashville to create Communidad in the following video: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/clas/regina-jose-galindo

Other members of the Nashville community are invited to observe the performance piece as well.

For more information, or to RSVP, click here.

Michele Pred on The Patriot Act

posted by – 11/01/16 @ 1:17pm

michele-predLast Wednesday was the 15-year anniversary of the passage of the Patriot Act – an Act of Congress whose abbreviation (USA PATRIOT), expanded, describes, “Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism.”  The Patriot Act was passed into law immediately following the terrorist attacks in the fall of 2001, without receiving much scrutiny.  In hindsight of its passing, legislators began to realize the significance of the laws they put into place and how they could potentially subvert federal privacy laws.  Since the tragedies of September 11, 2001, Congress has adopted quite a few new laws that many citizens feel interfere with the delicate balance between combating domestic terrorism and maintaining our own civil rights.  To date, hundreds of American factions have attempted to pass resolutions against the Patriot Act, stating they will not comply with much or all of its restrictions.

One such restriction of the Patriot Act was the federalization and strengthening of airport screening.  At the baggage claim of the San Francisco International Airport, travelers were greeted by conceptual artist, Michele Pred. Clothed in 1960’s-era flight attendant dress, Pred gifted tiny pocket knives reading, “Official Air Travel Replacement Knife” to departing commuters.  The 2.25 inch knives Pred presented are the most common type of pocket knife confiscated by TSA officers.  In regards to the chosen text, Pred stated in an interview with Hyperallergic: “The text that I had printed on them was intended as a somewhat humorous way of driving home the notion that our focus on security has not only taken things away from us, but has not clearly explained what it has given back.”  Pred did receive a Free Speech and Expressive Activities Permit and permission from the airport after an extensive application process.

encirclementHer performance was an extension of a group exhibition through the FOR-SITE foundation in San Francisco, called Home Land Security Her “Encirclement” installation features hundreds of confiscated items from airports arranged in a ring, intended to call attention to the small personal cost that comes with growing airport security.  The exhibition is housed in the Presidio, a former military base overlooking the Bay area.  Home Land Security brings together contemporary artists making work to reflect on the complexity of national security.  The show will be on display through December 18, 2016.